What to Expect from Your Home Inspection

What to Expect from Your Home Inspection | MyKCM

You made an offer and it was accepted. Your next task is to have the home inspected prior to closing. Agents often recommend you make your offer contingent upon a clean home inspection.

This contingency allows you to renegotiate the price you offered for the home, ask the sellers to cover repairs, or in some cases, walk away if challenges arise. Your agent can advise you on the best course of action once the report is filed.

How to Choose an Inspector

Your agent will most likely have a shortlist of inspectors they’ve worked within the past to recommend to you. HGTV suggests you consider the following five areas when choosing the right home inspector for you:

1. Qualifications – Find out what’s included in your inspection and if the age or location of your home may warrant specific certifications or specialties.

2. Sample Reports – Ask for a sample inspection report so you can review how thoroughly they will be inspecting your dream home. In most cases, the more detailed the report,
the better.

3. References – Do your homework. Ask for phone numbers and names of past clients who you can call to discuss their experiences.

4. Memberships – Not all inspectors belong to a national or state association of home inspectors, and membership in one of these groups should not be the only way to evaluate your choice. Membership in one of these organizations does, however, often mean continued training and education are required.

5. Errors and Omission Insurance – Find out what the liability of the inspector or inspection company is once the inspection is over. The inspector is only human, after all, and it is possible they might miss something they should see.

Ask your inspector if it’s okay for you to tag along during the inspection, so they can point out anything that should be addressed or fixed.

Don’t be surprised to see your inspector climbing on the roof or crawling around in the attic and on the floors. The job of the inspector is to protect your investment and find any issues with the home, including but not limited to: the roof, plumbing, electrical components, appliances, heating and air conditioning systems, ventilation, windows, fireplace and chimney, foundation, and so much more.

Bottom Line

They say, ‘ignorance is bliss,’ but not when investing your hard-earned money into a home of your own. Work with a professional you can trust to give you the most information possible, so you can make the most educated decision about your purchase.

Are you thinking about buying a home? Download my free Buyers Guide, “Things to consider when buying a home”. And start you home search at mynexthome.com.

Dani

Items to Check before a Homebuyer Inspection

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Selling a home can be a stressful time, there is so much to think about; keeping the house clean, heading out on a moment’s notice to accommodate last minute showings, not to mention planning a move. It is natural to feel overwhelmed.

Then you get that great offer and enter escrow. You are relieved until you realize there is a home inspection coming. Even a home meticulously maintained can have hidden issues. The good news is that you can prepare for the home inspection and make sure you pass with flying colors!

Here is a list of items to check before a home inspection is performed to help eliminate the number of items on the buyer’s repair list.

  • Doors, windows, cabinets, and drawers: check that they slide smoothly.
  • Run water in sinks, tubs, and showers: snake any that drain slowly.
  • Look for evidence of water leaks: garage ceiling, house ceilings, under sinks, around the water heater, etc.
  • GFIs: check our local code and put GFI plugs where required and check installed GFI plugs to make sure they work correctly.
  • Smoke and carbon monoxide detectors: check that they are in working order by testing.
  • Gutter and roof: replace any missing roof tiles, check flashing around the roof and clean gutters.
  • HVC: consider HVAC servicing to replace filters and check for problems.
  • The water heater: is it properly strapped and vented.
  • Deferred maintenance: anything that has been neglected should be addressed before the home inspection.

The best defense is a good offense. This is true in home inspections too! The best way to ensure you have an excellent home inspection is to have a pre-listing home inspection. It could be the best couple hundred dollars you can spend. Better to uncover the issues before the buyer does.

Ready to buy and/or sell a home? Call, text or email me! If you are active on social media, please look me up on Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter and Instagram using the icons on the bottom right of this page.
Dani

What are Contingencies in a Real Estate Contract?

Contingency

Contingencies are commonplace in contracts of all kinds. A contingency allows for one party or another to legally back out of a contract in the event of some specific condition occurring. They are protection against the unknown.

In real estate, there can be contingencies inserted for either buyer or seller or both. These take many different forms, and until removed in writing, either party may change their minds based on the result of the contingent event or issue.

Here are some examples of home buyer contingencies:

  • Home inspections – May identify the need for major repairs or builder oversights that a buyer is not prepared to take on
  • Specialty inspections – Mold, geological, roof inspections
  • Code Violations – An investigation into improvements made without permits
  • Lender Appraisal – Ensures the offered price is not too high
  • Sale of Current Home – Allows the buyer to back out if they cannot sell their current home in a specific time frame
  • Final Loan Approval – Loan is ready for signature and close
  • HOA CC&Rs – Review of documents to ensure rules and regulations do not infringe on the enjoyment of the property
  • Insurability – Home owner’s insurance available at a reasonable rate

Home sellers can also have contingencies included, such as one which states the sale is contingent on finding a replacement home. If the conditions of the contingency clause are not met, the contract becomes null and void, and one party can back out without legal consequences.

Contingencies are a fact of contract law, and in real estate, they ensure that buyers and sellers know their roles and obligations. Because time is of the essence, each contingency has a specific deadline. Be sure to pay close attention to these deadlines to avoid negative and costly effects on the real estate transaction.

Ready to start looking for Your NextHome? Send me a message using the box to the right, or call, text or email me! If you are active on social media, please look me up on Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter and Instagram using the icons on the bottom right of this page.

Dani